About The Course
Welcome Message

Welcome to the CoursePlus Web site for UNDERSTANDING AND PREVENTING VIOLENCE (301.627.01), a course offered by the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

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Course Description

Explores the role of public health in reducing violence and associated injuries. Focuses on factors that contribute to interpersonal violence, policy issues relevant to violence and violence prevention, and approaches to violence prevention and their effectiveness. Topics include the epidemiology of violence; biological, psychological, social, and environmental factors related to violence; intimate partner violence; the role of alcohol and other drugs; firearms policy; behavioral approaches to violence prevention; and community efforts to prevent violence.

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Course Learning Objectives

Upon successfully completing this course, students will be able to: Identify societal, neighborhood, family, situational, and individual (biological and psychological) factors influence the likelihood and severity of violence. Explain how and why these factors influence the likelihood or severity of violence, drawing upon existing theories. Appropriately apply public health methods, strategies, and paradigms to the problem of violence and its prevention. Identify strengths and weaknesses of policies and programs intended to reduce violence.

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Course Time

Mon Wed   10:30 AM to 11:50 AM

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Course Faculty
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Prerequisites

Additional Faculty Notes:

There are no strict prerequisites for this course; however, students who have not taken and passed introductory, college-level courses in social sciences (sociology, psychology, economics) as well as basic courses in epidemiology and/or research methods will have difficulty with course content.

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Intended Audience

Additional Faculty Notes:

These course is geared toward public health students; however, it is also relevant for students studying public policy, sociology, and psychology.

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Course Topics

Causes of violence including biological, psychosocial, social structure, culture, economic conditions, community conditions (physical and social disorder, collective efficacy), alcohol and drug abuse, and the availability and lethality of weapons. Much of the course will focus on family and youth violence. Course will examine the following policy areas - housing, alcohol, drugs, firearms, social service, criminal justice, and juvenile justice.

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Grading Policy & Grading Restrictions

Grading Policy: Student evaluation based on three take-home problem sets.

Grading Restrictions: Letter grade

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