About The Course
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Welcome to the CoursePlus Web site for FUNDAMENTALS OF REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY (120.620.01), a course offered by the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

This course addresses the basic biological mechanisms that underlie male and female reproduction and that pertain to reproductive health issues, such as contraception, infertility, sexually transmitted diseases, and reproductive aging. Student evaluation is based on online quizzes and a final exam.  I aim for teaching this class at a level comparable to an introductory college-level biology course (e.g., comparable to the typical Biology 101 course in freshman year). Thus, this course is suitable for students with limited backgrounds in the biological sciences, although having had a basic biology course will be helpful. 

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Course Description

Addresses the basic biological mechanisms that underlie male and female reproduction and that pertain to reproductive health issues, such as contraception, infertility, sexually transmitted diseases, and reproductive aging. Suitable for students with limited backgrounds in the biological sciences.

Additional Faculty Notes:

This course is designed for a diverse audience, including students with limited background in the biological sciences as well as those who were undergraduate science majors.  I aim for a "Bio 101" level, i.e., introductory college-level biology, comparable to what would be taken by a college freshman or by someone who has had high school biology, but not necessarily a lot of college-level biology.  That said, make no mistake, this is a bona fide biology course, but I strive very hard to make the material understandable by all.  I also encourage students to identify their learning style (see www.vark-learn.com), so that students are using skills in class and during studying that are best suited to their own individual learning style. 

 

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Course Learning Objectives

After completing this course, this student should be able to: (1) demonstrate a working knowledge of biological aspects pertinent to a variety of issues in reproduction and reproductive health and medicine (2) comprehend biological issues in reproductive health and medicine at a level sufficient to explain and analyze questions of interest (3) use this knowledge of the biological principles of reproduction in practical ‘real world’ applications, such as writing position papers or explaining relevant information to lay people such as patients or groups (e.g., how a contraceptive works, what the advantages and risks of in vitro fertilization are, why there is controversy regarding embryonic stem cell research).

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Course Time

Tue Thu   3:30 PM to 4:50 PM

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Course Faculty
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Grading Policy & Grading Restrictions

Grading Policy: Student evaluation based on mid-term and final exams.

Grading Restrictions: Letter grade

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Textbooks Required

There is not a required textbook for this class.  For those who are interested in a resource book for supplemental information, there are several options: 

Essential Reproduction, 5th edition (2000), Martin H. Johnson and Barry J. Everitt
     This text is not required.  It is very thorough and goes into much more detail than we will on several topics.  However, it is a good resource if you would like a reference with plenty of supplemental information.


Handbook of Andrology  (published by the American Society of Andrology)
Available on-line:  http://andrologysociety.com/resources/handbook.aspx
     This text covers topics in male reproductive biology at a basic, fundamental level, more similar to the level of depth we will use in class. 

Human Reproductive Biology, 3rd edition (2006), Richard E. Jones and Kristen H. Lopez
     This text is not required.  I have not carefully reviewed the current edition, but it also appears to be very thorough and with more detail than we have in class.  But I suspect that this too would be a good resource if you would like a reference with plenty of supplemental information.  Based on the Table of Contents I viewed on Amazon, this book has more chapters on practical and applied aspects of reproductive biology (contraception, infertility, abortion, etc.) than does Essential Reproduction. 

Human Reproductive Biology, (2005), Sylvia S. Mader, McGraw Hill
     This text is not required.  I have not carefully reviewed this book at all, but I know of a colleague who is using this book for a introductory level reproductive biology class.  I suspect that this too would be a good resource if you would like a reference, and this might be closer to the level at which we cover material in class (but again, I have not extensively reviewed this book).


Endotext.org - online text with a focus on endocrinology (hormones, in reproduction and other physiological processes); much more detail than we will cover in class.
 

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Administrative Contact

Janice Evans
E-mail: jpevans@jhsph.edu

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