SOCIAL, PSYCHOLOGICAL, AND DEVELOPMENTAL PROCESSES IN THE ETIOLOGY OF MENTAL DISORDERS Syllabus

330.661.01 | AY 2011-2012 - 3rd Term | 3 Credit(s)
MW 1:30:00 PM
  • Contact Information
  • Course Learning Objectives

    Upon successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

    • help students gain an Discussing of leading social, psychological, and developmental theories that serve as the foundation for public mental health research
    • Students will also develop skills that will help them critically evaluate mental health research from multiple theoretical perspectives
    • At the conclusion of the course, students should be able to draw upon these theories to support their own mental health or services research (e.g. dissertations, grant applications)
  • Course Description

    Examines the major social, psychological, and developmental theories of mental and behavioral disorders. Covers biopsychosocial frameworks such as the diathesis stress model, ecological theory, and life course development. Psychological models include behavioral, cognitive, personality, and psychodynamic theories. Covers social processes covered such as social stratification, social integration, social diffusion, social stress, social learning, social cognitive, and attachment. Applies these theories to major mental and behavioral disorders of childhood, adolescence, and adulthood, including depression, anxiety, conduct disorders, and personality disorders. Explores multidisciplinary areas, and includes guest lectures by other mental health faculty. Lectures highlight main issues from readings, provide additional information on theories, and apply reading and lecture materials to specific mental and behavioral disorders.

  • Methods of Assessment

    Grading Policy: Based on class participation, oral presentation, a research paper and a final exam. For doctoral students in DMH, a research paper and oral presentation is required for the additional unit (1.0) of course credit.

    Grading Restrictions: Letter grade

  • Academic Ethics Code

    The code, discussed in the Policy and Procedure Memorandum for Students, March 31, 2002, will be adhered to in this class:

    Students enrolled in the Bloomberg School of Public Health of The Johns Hopkins University assume an obligation to conduct themselves in a manner appropriate to the University's mission as an institution of higher education. A student is obligated to refrain from acts which he or she knows, or under the circumstances has reason to know, impair the academic integrity of the University. Violations of academic integrity include, but are not limited to: cheating; plagiarism; knowingly furnishing false information to any agent of the University for inclusion in the academic record; violation of the rights and welfare of animal or human subjects in research; and misconduct as a member of either School or University committees or recognized groups or organizations.

  • Disability Support Services

    If you are a student with a documented disability who requires an academic accommodation, please contact Betty H. Addison in the Office of Student Life Services: baddison@jhsph.edu, 410-955-3034, or 2017 E. Monument Street.