ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH Syllabus

180.601.01 | AY 2012-2013 - Summer Term | 5 Credit(s)
MWF 1:30:00 PM
  • Contact Information
    Faculty
    Jonathan Links
  • Course Learning Objectives

    Upon successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Define the major environmental agents (i.e. environmental chemical, biological, and physical agents that cause adverse effects on human health) and their sources
    • Discuss the transport and fate of these agents in the environment, and identify the carriers or vectors (air, water, soil, and food) that promote the transfer of these agents from the environment to the human
    • Describe the toxicokinetics of these agents in the body, including the effect of route of entry (inhalation, ingestion, absorption)
    • Describe the toxicodynamics of these agents, including biotransformation and the mechanisms by which they exert adverse health effects, and the use of models for prediction of the magnitude of adverse effects
    • Identify and define the steps in the risk assessment process, including both exposure and dose-response assessment, and the sources and magnitude of uncertainty
    • Describe various risk management approaches, including regulatory, engineering, and behavioral/risk communication options
    • Describe specific genetic factors (including gender- and ethnicity-related factors), physiologic factors (including age- and health status-related factors), and psychosocial factors (including SES- and social/cultural-related factors) that influence the risk of exposure and/or the likelihood of developing adverse health outcomes from exposure to environmental agents
    • Identify techniques for improving risk assessment and risk management strategies, including consideration of: (1) factors in the physical environment, (2) factors in the social environment, (3) community-based participation in both the assessment/management process and in basic environmental/public health research, and (4) issues of environmental justice/equity
  • Course Description
    Examines health issues, scientific understanding of causes, and possible future approaches to control of the major environmental health problems in industrialized and developing countries. Topics include how the body reacts to environmental pollutants; physical, chemical, and biological agents of environmental contamination; vectors for dissemination (air, water, soil); solid and hazardous waste; susceptible populations; biomarkers and risk analysis; the scientific basis for policy decisions; and emerging global environmental health problems.
  • Intended Audience
    Not available.
  • Methods of Assessment
    Student evaluation based on projects and exams.

    Additional Faculty Notes:

    Exams, Assignments, and Grading:

    2 multiple-choice exams, each worth 1/3 of course grade

    1 end-of-course assignment, worth 1/3 of course grade

    Final course letter grade: A = 90-100, B = 80-89, C = 70-79

  • Prerequisites
    College courses in general biology, algebra, and physics or chemistry.

    Additional Faculty Notes:

    Please do not worry if you don't have all (or any) of these prerequisites - we will work to make sure any background principles are presented in class.

  • Required Text(s)

    Additional Faculty Notes:

    Recommended Textbooks:

    (no required textbook)

    Basic text:

    Friis RH. Essentials of Environmental Health. Second Edition. Jones & Bartlett, Sudbury MA, 2012

    More advanced text:

    Frumkin H (editor). Environmental Health – From Global to Local. Second Edition. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, 2010

  • Course Schedule

    Please see the course Session for a full list of dates and items for this course.

  • Academic Ethics Code

    Students enrolled in the Bloomberg School of Public Health of The Johns Hopkins University assume an obligation to conduct themselves in a manner appropriate to the University's mission as an institution of higher education. A student is obligated to refrain from acts which he or she knows, or under the circumstances has reason to know, impair the academic integrity of the University. Violations of academic integrity include, but are not limited to: cheating; plagiarism; knowingly furnishing false information to any agent of the University for inclusion in the academic record; violation of the rights and welfare of animal or human subjects in research; and misconduct as a member of either School or University committees or recognized groups or organizations.

  • Welcome Message

    Welcome, new students! We are excited to have you in our course, Environmental Health. We are committed to your learning, and to making the course highly relevant to your career in public health.

    Jon Links, John Groopman, and Brian Schwartz

  • Contact Information(from old syllabus)

    John Groopman, PhD
    Email: jgroopma@jhsph.edu

    Brian Schwartz, MD, MS
    Email: bschwart@jhsph.edu

    Tyna Dao
    Email: tynadao@gmail.com

    Jose Flores
    Email: jose.flores@jhmi.edu

  • Disability Support Services
    If you are a student with a documented disability who requires an academic accommodation, please contact the Office of Student Life Services at 410-955-3034 or via email at dss@jhsph.edu.