FUNDAMENTALS OF REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY Syllabus

120.620.01 | AY 2012-2013 - 1st Term | 3 Credit(s)
TTh 3:30:00 PM
  • Contact Information
    Faculty
    Janice Evans
  • Course Learning Objectives

    Information not required for this course type

  • Course Description
    Addresses the basic biological mechanisms that underlie male and female reproduction and that pertain to reproductive health issues, such as contraception, infertility, sexually transmitted diseases, and reproductive aging. Suitable for students with limited backgrounds in the biological sciences.

    Additional Faculty Notes:

    This course is designed for a diverse audience, including students with limited background in the biological sciences as well as those who were undergraduate science majors.  I aim for a "Bio 101" level, i.e., introductory college-level biology, comparable to what would be taken by a college freshman or by someone who has had high school biology, but not necessarily a lot of college-level biology.  That said, make no mistake, this is a bona fide biology course, but I strive very hard to make the material understandable by all.  I also encourage students to identify their learning style (see www.vark-learn.com), so that students are using skills in class and during studying that are best suited to their own individual learning style. 

     

  • Intended Audience

    Additional Faculty Notes:

    This course is designed for and traditionally has a diverse group of students -- and this is one aspect of this course that makes it especially satisfying for me as an instructor. This class has included reproductive health students from the Department of Population and Family Reproductive Health, reproductive biology students from the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, MHS and MPH and DrPH candidates with a variety of backgrounds and interests, and undergraduates from Homewood. The range of interests and backgrounds of students in the class adds greatly to the environment and experiences during the course.

  • Methods of Assessment
    Student evaluation based on mid-term and final exams.

    Additional Faculty Notes:

    Final grade based on online quizzes and final exam.  The final exam is in-class, closed book, cumulative.  On the other hand, the quizzes are  "open book, open notes, open people."  You may refer to class materials, other sources, and work as a group.  The purpose of the quizzes is to get you to sit down and review your notes throughout the term, not just right before the final!

     

  • Prerequisites

    Additional Faculty Notes:

    None -- although a previous course in basic biology (i.e., "Bio 101") is very helpful. 


  • Required Text(s)

    Additional Faculty Notes:

    There is not a required textbook for this class.  For those who are interested in a resource book for supplemental information, there are several options: 

    Essential Reproduction, 5th edition (2000), Martin H. Johnson and Barry J. Everitt
         This text is not required.  It is very thorough and goes into much more detail than we will on several topics.  However, it is a good resource if you would like a reference with plenty of supplemental information.


    Handbook of Andrology  (published by the American Society of Andrology)
    Available on-line:  http://andrologysociety.com/resources/handbook.aspx
         This text covers topics in male reproductive biology at a basic, fundamental level, more similar to the level of depth we will use in class. 

    Human Reproductive Biology, 3rd edition (2006), Richard E. Jones and Kristen H. Lopez
         This text is not required.  I have not carefully reviewed the current edition, but it also appears to be very thorough and with more detail than we have in class.  But I suspect that this too would be a good resource if you would like a reference with plenty of supplemental information.  Based on the Table of Contents I viewed on Amazon, this book has more chapters on practical and applied aspects of reproductive biology (contraception, infertility, abortion, etc.) than does Essential Reproduction. 

    Human Reproductive Biology, (2005), Sylvia S. Mader, McGraw Hill
         This text is not required.  I have not carefully reviewed this book at all, but I know of a colleague who is using this book for a introductory level reproductive biology class.  I suspect that this too would be a good resource if you would like a reference, and this might be closer to the level at which we cover material in class (but again, I have not extensively reviewed this book).


    Endotext.org - online text with a focus on endocrinology (hormones, in reproduction and other physiological processes); much more detail than we will cover in class.
     

  • Course Schedule

    Please see the course Session for a full list of dates and items for this course.

  • Academic Ethics Code

    Students enrolled in the Bloomberg School of Public Health of The Johns Hopkins University assume an obligation to conduct themselves in a manner appropriate to the University's mission as an institution of higher education. A student is obligated to refrain from acts which he or she knows, or under the circumstances has reason to know, impair the academic integrity of the University. Violations of academic integrity include, but are not limited to: cheating; plagiarism; knowingly furnishing false information to any agent of the University for inclusion in the academic record; violation of the rights and welfare of animal or human subjects in research; and misconduct as a member of either School or University committees or recognized groups or organizations.

  • Welcome Message

    This course addresses the basic biological mechanisms that underlie male and female reproduction and that pertain to reproductive health issues, such as contraception, infertility, sexually transmitted diseases, and reproductive aging. Student evaluation is based on online quizzes and a final exam.  I aim for teaching this class at a level comparable to an introductory college-level biology course (e.g., comparable to the typical Biology 101 course in freshman year). Thus, this course is suitable for students with limited backgrounds in the biological sciences, although having had a basic biology course will be helpful. 

  • Course topics

    Reproductive anatomy, physiology, and cell biology; current issues and hot topics in reproductive biology (varying form year to year, but often including contraception, infertility, assisted reproductive technologies, cloning, stem cells, sexually transmitted diseases, reproductive aging, environmental endocrine disruptors)

  • Contact Information(from old syllabus)

    Janice Evans
    Email: jpevans@jhsph.edu
    Office: W8508
    Tel: 410-614-5557

  • Course Objectives(from old syllabus)

    The overall goal of this course is for the student to obtain what could be called "reproductive biology literacy" -- the ability to understand, on a fundamental level, the biological aspects of a wide variety of issues related to reproduction and reproductive health and medicine. 

  • Disability Support Services
    If you are a student with a documented disability who requires an academic accommodation, please contact the Office of Student Life Services at 410-955-3034 or via email at dss@jhsph.edu.