INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES ON WOMEN, GENDER, AND HEALTH Syllabus

380.668.01 | AY 2012-2013 - 3rd Term | 3 Credit(s)
M 8:00:00 AM
  • Contact Information
    Faculty
    Michelle Hindin
  • Course Learning Objectives

    Upon successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

    • identify the multiple mechanisms by which the family, neighborhood/community, and national context adversely impacts women's health in developing countries
    • After completing this course, students should be able to explain disparities in men’s and women’s health from a multidisciplinary perspective (sociology, economics, and international development)
  • Course Description
    Examines the ways by which the study of gender informs the study of health in the developing world with a focus on women's health issues. Explores the ways in which gender and sex help us to understand women's health and explain societal patterns of health, disease and well-being. Topics include both reproductive and nonreproductive health issues including mental health and physical health.

    Additional Faculty Notes:

    This course will examine the ways by which the study of gender informs the study of health in the developing world with a focus on women’s health issues. Together we will explore the ways in which gender and sex help us to understand women’s health and explain societal patterns of health, disease, and well-being. Topics will include both reproductive and non-reproductive health issues including mental health and physical health. Student evaluation is based on an discussion questions, an in-class presentation and a critique of the literature in one of the areas of gender and health.

  • Intended Audience
    All Public Health Graduate Students

    Additional Faculty Notes:
    All graduate students with consent of the instructor

  • Methods of Assessment
    Leading class discussion and literature review/critique.

    Additional Faculty Notes:

    Turning in three sets of questions for discussion

    Co-leading a class discussion session

    Final Paper/Critique

  • Required Text(s)

    Additional Faculty Notes:
    None

  • Course Schedule

    Please see the course Session for a full list of dates and items for this course.

  • Academic Ethics Code

    Students enrolled in the Bloomberg School of Public Health of The Johns Hopkins University assume an obligation to conduct themselves in a manner appropriate to the University's mission as an institution of higher education. A student is obligated to refrain from acts which he or she knows, or under the circumstances has reason to know, impair the academic integrity of the University. Violations of academic integrity include, but are not limited to: cheating; plagiarism; knowingly furnishing false information to any agent of the University for inclusion in the academic record; violation of the rights and welfare of animal or human subjects in research; and misconduct as a member of either School or University committees or recognized groups or organizations.

  • Course topics
    Theoretical perspectives on gender Frameworks Gender, Health and Development
  • Contact Information(from old syllabus)

    Michelle Hindin, MHS, PhD
    Email: mhindin@jhsph.edu
    Office: E4136
    Tel: 410-502-6038

  • Course Objectives(from old syllabus)
    Be able to understand how social context impacts women's health Be able to draw from multidisciplinary perspectives to help explain disparities in health
  • Disability Support Services
    If you are a student with a documented disability who requires an academic accommodation, please contact the Office of Student Life Services at 410-955-3034 or via email at dss@jhsph.edu.