CONFRONTING THE BURDEN OF INJURIES:A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE Syllabus

221.612.01 | AY 2013-2014 - 2nd Term | 3 Credit(s)
TTh 3:30:00 PM
  • Contact Information
    Faculty
    Adnan Hyder
  • Course Learning Objectives

    Upon successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Describe current estimates of the burden of injuries globally
    • Identify the current estimates of the burden of injuries globally
    • Describe approaches to measuring the burden of injuries, including costs
    • Assess the magnitude of the problem and evaluate the current/potential interventions
    • promote effective use of data for policy development and provide tools to conduct policy analysis for reduction of injury burden
  • Course Description
    Provides an understanding of approaches to measuring the burden of injuries around the world and familiarizes students with current estimates of the burden of injuries in the global and developing world. Develops basic skills for assessment of injury epidemiology. Provides an appreciation of how to use these measures for planning interventions for injury prevention and creates awareness of the economic implications of injuries in the developing world. Promotes effective use of data for appropriate policy analysis for reduction of injury burden.

    Additional Faculty Notes:
    Welcome to "Confronting the Burden of Injuries--A Global Perspective". This course highlights the role of injury as a leading cause of healthy years of life lost and burden on health in both poor and industrialized populations. It describes the magnitude, nature, and neglect of the injury problem in countries with little history of injury prevention, discusses approaches to assessing the impact of injuries and evaluating needs and program successes in such countries, and emphasizes opportunities and barriers to applying effective and efficient injury control measures.

  • Intended Audience

    Additional Faculty Notes:
    This course is intended to guide students interested in working on injury control in countries with no tradition in injury prevention from a public health perspective. The students will learn to define the problem, assess its magnitude, identify data sources, assess quality of the data, identify which agencies or institutions should be involved in the solution of the problem, identify which interventions are in place, which interventions need to be evaluated, how to elaborate a strategic plan for establishment/improvement of injury prevention programs in such countries, and how to present such a plan to authorities.

  • Methods of Assessment
    Student evaluation based on class participation and a term paper.

    Additional Faculty Notes:

    Student evaluation will be based on the completion of a course project and on class attendance and participation. The course project will require each student to prepare a presentation with the purpose of briefing a high-level official of a chosen geographical region on the need for establishing an injury prevention plan and proposing such a plan.  The first part of the assignment will require students to define their chosen injury problem and identify data sources that will be used in support of the final proposal.  Students will present their final proposals to the class in an oral presentation at the end of the course.  Class attendance and participation in discussions will comprise an important part of each session. 


    The course grade will be based on the following components: 

    Assignment Part 1: 40%

    Assignment Part 2: 40%

    Class attendance & participation: 20% 

     

  • Prerequisites
    340.601; recommended 305.610

    Additional Faculty Notes:
    340.601 (Principles of Epidemiology) required; and 305.610 (Issues in Injury Control) required or instructor consent.

  • Required Text(s)

    Additional Faculty Notes:
    Required readings for the course are available through the Courseplus system

  • Course Schedule

    Please see the course Session for a full list of dates and items for this course.

  • Academic Ethics Code

    Students enrolled in the Bloomberg School of Public Health of The Johns Hopkins University assume an obligation to conduct themselves in a manner appropriate to the University's mission as an institution of higher education. A student is obligated to refrain from acts which he or she knows, or under the circumstances has reason to know, impair the academic integrity of the University. Violations of academic integrity include, but are not limited to: cheating; plagiarism; knowingly furnishing false information to any agent of the University for inclusion in the academic record; violation of the rights and welfare of animal or human subjects in research; and misconduct as a member of either School or University committees or recognized groups or organizations.

  • Welcome Message

    The Department of International Health is offering this course jointly with the Department of Health Policy and Management. This is a three-credit course in the second term, meeting on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3:30 to 4:50.
     

  • Course topics
    Earlier sessions will be devoted to assessing the magnitude of the injury problem. These will cover methodological concepts in injury prevention, including how injury prevention interventions are selected, implemented, enforced, and evaluated and what governmental and non-governmental agencies are (or should be) involved in to address the injury problem. We will also discuss how to identify the interventions already in place, how to develop a strategic plan, how to identify "key collaborators" to support the plan. In each seminar, we will pay special attention to discuss country-specific issues, as well as issues that pertain to data shared at an international level. Later sessions will be devoted to complementary aspects of injury prevention and case studies will be presented for discussion.
  • Contact Information(from old syllabus)

    Connie Hoe, MSW
    Email: choe@jhsph.edu

  • Course Objectives(from old syllabus)
    This course will: (1) familiarize participants with current estimates of the burden of injuries globally (2) provide a sound understanding of approaches to measuring the burden of injuries, including costs (3) develop basic skills for assessment of the magnitude of the problem and evaluation of current/potential interventions (4) promote effective use of data for policy development and provide tools to conduct policy analysis for reduction of injury burden.
  • Disability Support Services
    If you are a student with a documented disability who requires an academic accommodation, please contact the Office of Student Life Services at 410-955-3034 or via email at dss@jhsph.edu.