MAJOR GLOBAL INFECTIOUS DISEASES: PROSPECTS FOR CONTROL Syllabus

260.606.13 | AY 2013-2014 - Winter I Term | 2 Credit(s)
MTWThF 1:30:00 PM
  • Contact Information
    Faculty
    Joseph Margolick
  • Course Learning Objectives

    Upon successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Discuss the biology of major global infectious diseases, including prospects for their effective management and control at both the individual and public health level, and of basic human immunology and vaccinology
  • Course Description
    Provides in-depth information on the basic pathogenic mechanisms of selected infectious diseases that continue to be of major public health importance worldwide, with an emphasis on underlying problems for development of effective public health interventions. Topics include HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, measles, as well as infectious disease hazards that may become important in the future. Students obtain a working knowledge of the biology of these diseases, including prospects for their effective management and control at both the individual and public health level, and of basic human immunology and vaccinology
  • Intended Audience
    Winter Institute participants
  • Methods of Assessment
    Student evaluation is based on class participation and responses to written questions
  • Course Schedule

    Please see the course Session for a full list of dates and items for this course.

  • Academic Ethics Code

    Students enrolled in the Bloomberg School of Public Health of The Johns Hopkins University assume an obligation to conduct themselves in a manner appropriate to the University's mission as an institution of higher education. A student is obligated to refrain from acts which he or she knows, or under the circumstances has reason to know, impair the academic integrity of the University. Violations of academic integrity include, but are not limited to: cheating; plagiarism; knowingly furnishing false information to any agent of the University for inclusion in the academic record; violation of the rights and welfare of animal or human subjects in research; and misconduct as a member of either School or University committees or recognized groups or organizations.

  • Welcome Message

    Sessions will be as follows:

    1   (Monday)-           Introduction to the Class; Margolick

         (Monday)-           TB   

         (Monday)-           Clinical TB: Drug resistance and latent TB:  Zhang

         (Monday)-           Prevention of TB:  Golub            

    2   (Tuesday)-         HIV

         (Tuesday)-         Pathogenesis and Epidemiology of HIV:  Margolick      

         (Tuesday)-         Transmission of HIV:  Markham  

         (Tuesday)-         Vaccines--principles and prospects for an HIV vaccine: Yu 

         (Tuesday)-         Prevention of HIV infection: Beyrer                  

    3   (Wednesday)-   Measles

         (Wednesday)-   Measles: Background:  Griffin

         (Wednesday)-   Measles: Control strategies:   Moss

         (Wednesday)-   Measles: Obstacles to control:  Moss 

         (Wednesday)-   Measles: Solutions:  Griffin

    4   (Thursday)-       Malaria

          (Thursday)-      Clinical malaria, malaria diagnosis, treatment, resistance Sullivan                                                

          (Thursday)-      Epidemiology and control of malaria  Shiff

          (Thursday)-      Mosquito control  Jacobs-Lorena  

          (Thursday)-      Malaria vaccines  Zavala

    5    (Friday)-            Current Topics in ID

          (Friday)-             Issues in poliomyelitis eradication:  Griffin

          (Friday)-             Viral Hepatitis:  Thomas  

          (Friday)-             Influenza:  Pekosz

          (Friday)-            The microbiome in health and disease   Sears

  • Disability Support Services
    If you are a student with a documented disability who requires an academic accommodation, please contact the Office of Student Life Services at 410-955-3034 or via email at dss@jhsph.edu.