SPECIAL TOPICS IN HEALTH AND HUMAN RIGHTS: PUBLIC HEALTH IMPLICATIONS OF HEALTH AS A HUMAN RIGHT Syllabus

180.600.13 | AY 2013-2014 - Winter I Term | 2 Credit(s)
MTWThF 1:30:00 PM
  • Contact Information
    Faculty
    David Stein
    Robert Lawrence
    TA
    Kerry Shannon
    H: 908-458-2830
  • Course Learning Objectives

    Upon successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Apply a human rights framework to the analysis of key determinants of health status and public health policies, programs and practices.
  • Course Description

    This course explores how international agreements (treaties) can help to build a state and local culture that fosters full realization of human rights for individuals and for groups. 

    The course also applies a human rights framework to the analysis of determinants of health status and health policies, programs and practices. Readings and discussions explore health as a human right and its implications for public health practice. It focuses broadly on three areas: (1) health as a human right, (2) impact of public health policies, programs and practices on human rights, and (3) collective health impact of human rights violations, whether gross violations in human conflict or insidious violations associated with mistreatment of marginalized groups. Topics include: (1) international instruments defining human rights principles, their historical development and application, (2) operationalization of the right to health and its consequences for public health practice, (3) governmental obligations for health under international human rights law, (4) linkages between health and human rights, and (5) application of the human rights framework to the design, implementation, and evaluation of public health programs.

  • Intended Audience
    MPH students and health and human rights seminar students.
  • Methods of Assessment

    Class participation, several short assignments, and one final paper of about 1500 words. 

  • Prerequisites

    Additional Faculty Notes:
    There are no prerequisites for this course.

  • Course Schedule

    Please see the course Session for a full list of dates and items for this course.

  • Academic Ethics Code

    Students enrolled in the Bloomberg School of Public Health of The Johns Hopkins University assume an obligation to conduct themselves in a manner appropriate to the University's mission as an institution of higher education. A student is obligated to refrain from acts which he or she knows, or under the circumstances has reason to know, impair the academic integrity of the University. Violations of academic integrity include, but are not limited to: cheating; plagiarism; knowingly furnishing false information to any agent of the University for inclusion in the academic record; violation of the rights and welfare of animal or human subjects in research; and misconduct as a member of either School or University committees or recognized groups or organizations.

  • Welcome Message

    For January 2014  the class will meet in Room E6519 of the 615 N. Wolfe St. building. Each individual class session, as found on Course-Plus, will contain the most updated class materials, which should be viewed after signing in. Links to most required readings are available by clicking on the "Class Materials & Resources" tab, then clicking the "On-line Library Files" section to reveal the syllabus file. Additional material, especially that from the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights can be found on-line at: www.ohchr.org and other web sites.

  • Contact Information(from old syllabus)

    David Stein
    Email: ds5@jhmi.edu
    Office: W7010

    Robert Lawrence
    Email: rlawrenc@jhsph.edu
    Office: W7011
    Tel: 410-614-4590

    Kerry Shannon

    Email: shannonk7@gmail.com

    Tel: 908-458-2830

     

  • Course Objectives(from old syllabus)

    Course objectives: 1. Understand the nature of human rights law and how this law is implemented

    2. Recognize the relationship between health and human rights

    3. Identify and apply key human rights principles and documents to the analysis of public health problems

    4. Acquire knowledge that will help to advocate for human rights, especially those related to health.

  • Disability Support Services
    If you are a student with a documented disability who requires an academic accommodation, please contact the Office of Student Life Services at 410-955-3034 or via email at dss@jhsph.edu.