EPIDEMIOLOGY AND NATURAL HISTORY OF HUMAN VIRAL INFECTIONS Syllabus

340.654.01 | AY 2013-2014 - 3rd Term | 6 Credit(s)
MWF 1:30:00 PM
  • Contact Information
    Faculty
    Homayoon Farzadegan
    TA
    Erin Ewald
  • Course Learning Objectives

    Upon successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Describe the common structures and functions of viruses and their components, including genetics, etc
    • Identify the main steps of viral pathogenesis
    • Discuss virus-host interactions
    • Recognize the advantages and limiting factors related to antiviral treatment options
    • List several viruses and describe the processes by which they can cause cancer
    • Recall the interaction between viral agents and other factors in the disease pathway
    • Compare the pathogenesis of retroviruses with other viruses, including the mechanisms of invasion and integration and synthesis of new viral particles
    • Recognize and describe the issues of treatment, prevention, and future concerns of human immunodeficiency virus and AIDS
    • Compare and contrast the epidemiology and natural history of other human viral pathogens, including influenza, herpes simplex virus, bovine spongiform encephalitis and others
  • Course Description

    Emphasizes biology, epidemiology, and pathogenesis of diseases caused by human viruses. Discusses virus interaction with host, diagnostic methodologies, immunization, and treatment of viral infections. Examines relationships between viral infections and oncogenesis such as hepatitis/liver cancer, HPV/cervical cancer, EBV/lymphoma, and HTLV/leukemia. Also covers biology and natural history of major viral families such as retroviruses, rabies, and others.

  • Intended Audience

    Students wishing to gain a basic knowledge of the epidemiology of human viral infections

  • Methods of Assessment
     

    Mid-Term Exam 25%

    Final Exam 25%

    Presentation & Discussion 25%

    Attendance & Participation 25%

     

  • Prerequisites

    General biology and introductory epidemiology.

  • Required Text(s)

    The following books are recommended, but not required:

    Brooks, G., Carroll, K.C., Butel, J., Morse, S., Mietzner, T. (2010).  Jawetz, Melnick, & Adelberg's Medical Microbiology (25th Ed.). McGraw-Hill Medical

    Evans, A.S. & Kaslow, R.A., Eds. (1997). Viral Infections of Humans: Epidemiology and Control (4th Ed.). NY: Plenum Medical Book Co.

    .

  • Course Schedule

    Please see the course Session for a full list of dates and items for this course.

  • Academic Ethics Code

    Students enrolled in the Bloomberg School of Public Health of The Johns Hopkins University assume an obligation to conduct themselves in a manner appropriate to the University's mission as an institution of higher education. A student is obligated to refrain from acts which he or she knows, or under the circumstances has reason to know, impair the academic integrity of the University. Violations of academic integrity include, but are not limited to: cheating; plagiarism; knowingly furnishing false information to any agent of the University for inclusion in the academic record; violation of the rights and welfare of animal or human subjects in research; and misconduct as a member of either School or University committees or recognized groups or organizations.

  • Course topics

    Module 1: Overview of Viruses - Function, Host Response, and Advances in Diagnosis and Treatment

    • Structure and functions of viruses
    • Transmission, dissemination, and pathogenesis of viruses
    • Diagnostic virology in epidemiology
    • Anti-viral drugs 
    • Human immune response to viral infection
    • Vaccines against human viral infections


    Module 2: Viral Infections and Cancer

    • Human Papilloma Virus & cervical cancer 
    • Viral hepatitis & liver cancer 
    • Aflatoxin and hepatitis B virus interaction in human liver cancer
    • EBV & Burkitt's lymphoma and nasopharyngeal cancer
    • Kaposi's Sarcoma and HHV-8

     

    Module 3: Retroviruses

    • HTLVII/HTLVIII and Cancers
    • Retroviruses/HIV Pandemic 
    • HIV/AIDS Vaccines

     

    Module 4: Neuronal, Vectorborne, and other Interesting Viruses

    • Viral infections of the gut
    • Hepatitis E
    • Rabies
    • Arboviruses
    • Influenza
    • Paramyxoviruses, Parainfluenza, Mump, Measles
    • HSV1/HSV2 Infections
    • Spongiform Encephalopathies (Prions)

     

  • Contact Information for Guest Speakers

    Jay H. Bream, PhD
    Email: jbream@jhsph.edu

    Meghan F. Davis, DVM, MPH
    Email: mdavis@jhsph.edu

    Diane Griffin, MD, PhD
    Email: dgriffin@jhsph.edu

    John Groopman, PhD
    Email: jgroopma@jhsph.edu

    Craig Hendrix, MD
    Email: chendrix@jhmi.edu

    Lisa Jacobson, ScD, MS
    Email: ljacobso@jhsph.edu

    Richard Johnson, MD
    Email: rijohnso@jhsph.edu

    Alain Labrique, PhD, MHS, MS
    Email: alabriqu@jhsph.edu

    Hayley D. Mark, PhD, MPH, RN
    Email: hmark1@jhu.edu

    Shruti Mehta, PhD, MPH
    Email: shmehta@jhsph.edu

    Andrew Pekosz, PhD
    Email: apekosz@jhsph.edu

    Anne F. Rositch, PhD
    Email: arositch@jhsph.edu

    Kellogg Schwab, MS PhD
    Email: kschwab@jhsph.edu

     

  • Course Objectives

    Module 1

    • Describe the common structures and functions of viruses and their components, including genetics, etc.
    • Identify the main steps of viral pathogenesis
    • Discuss virus-host interactions
    • Recognize the advantages and limiting factors related to antiviral treatment options

    Module 2

    • List several viruses and describe the processes by which they can cause cancer
    • Recall the interaction between viral agents and other factors in the disease pathway

    Module 3

    • Compare the pathogenesis of retroviruses with other viruses, including the mechanisms of invasion and integration and synthesis of new viral particles
    • Recognize and describe the issues of treatment, prevention, and future concerns of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and AIDS

    Module 4

    • Compare and contrast the epidemiology and natural history of other human viral pathogens, including influenza, herpes simplex virus, bovine spongiform encephalitis and others
  • Disability Support Services
    If you are a student with a documented disability who requires an academic accommodation, please contact the Office of Student Life Services at 410-955-3034 or via email at dss@jhsph.edu.