CASE STUDIES IN MANAGEMENT DECISION-MAKING Syllabus

551.605.01 | AY 2013-2014 - 3rd Term | 3 Credit(s)
W 1:30:00 PM
  • Contact Information
    Faculty
    George Alleyne
    David Peters
  • Course Learning Objectives

    Upon successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Identify roles, motivation, points of conflict, and means of resolution between program and budget officials in a public agency
    • Identify how budget processes should be designed to improve organizational effectiveness
    • Analyze how dynamics of human relationships and communications affect organizational effectiveness
    • Practice communication skills to improve organizational effectiveness
    • Identify transitions in a non-profit organization
    • Identify how different models of board behavior can be used to manage organizational transition
    • Outline a plan for succession in an organization from the perspective of a consultant
    • Write a usable contract for health and social services
    • Identify the limitations of contracting for health and social services, and how to deal with them
    • Apply ethical approaches to practical health care program decisions
    • Identify how conflict emerges and how to deal with it in highly decentralized organizations
    • Identify and plan how to manage ambiguity in health organizations
    • Develop strategies to deal with complex human resource issues in health care using imperfect data and with pressures to save money
    • Identify how confusion of mission and conflict of interest operate at board and management levels in a health care organization
    • Practice good participation in a conflict-ridden meeting of a health organization
  • Course Description
    Students analyze problems and develop strategies based on real dilemmas faced by decision-makers. Students formulate positions before class and actively participate in discussion during class. Cases come from both International and U.S. settings, and deal with issues such as: conflict between budget and program offices, working with governing boards, contracting between government and non-government providers, dysfunctional clinics, reforming hospitals, managing local politics, cutting budgets and collaborating in informal organizations. Develops skills in leadership, negotiation, analysis, communication, and human resource management.

    Additional Faculty Notes:
    Students are challenged to analyze problems and develop strategies based on real dilemmas faced by decision-makers. Students are expected to formulate positions before class and actively participate in discussion during class. Cases come from international and US settings, and deal with: conflict between budget and program offices, working with governing boards, contracting between government and non-government providers, dysfunctional clinics, reforming hospitals, managing local politics, cutting budgets, and collaborating in informal organizations, and involve skills in leadership, negotiation, analysis, and communication.

  • Intended Audience
    IN & HPM management students; MPH students focussing on management.
  • Methods of Assessment
    Participating in class and written assignments.

    Additional Faculty Notes:

    Evaluation is based on the following basis: Assignment 1: 40% Assignment 2: 40% Assignment:Class Participation (Instructor): 20%

    The class participation grade is based on: (a) your preparedness for discussion (i.e. knowledge of the case); (b) the quality of your contributions to discussion (thoughtfulness of your positions); (c) your facilitation of contributions from others; and (d) your responsiveness to the contributions of others

  • Required Text(s)

    Additional Faculty Notes:

    Cases for each class are provided on the CoursePlus website. Background readings are assigned for each case to highlight some of the theoretical issues surrounding each case. Reading them will help you in your discussion.

  • Course Schedule

    Please see the course Session for a full list of dates and items for this course.

  • Academic Ethics Code

    Students enrolled in the Bloomberg School of Public Health of The Johns Hopkins University assume an obligation to conduct themselves in a manner appropriate to the University's mission as an institution of higher education. A student is obligated to refrain from acts which he or she knows, or under the circumstances has reason to know, impair the academic integrity of the University. Violations of academic integrity include, but are not limited to: cheating; plagiarism; knowingly furnishing false information to any agent of the University for inclusion in the academic record; violation of the rights and welfare of animal or human subjects in research; and misconduct as a member of either School or University committees or recognized groups or organizations.

  • Contact Information(from old syllabus)

    Pooja Sripad, Teaching Assistant
    Email: psripad@jhsph.edu

    Bill Ward, MBA
    Email: wward@jhsph.edu

  • Course Objectives(from old syllabus)
    To develop critical skills in health management through application of theory to “real world” case studies.
  • Disability Support Services
    If you are a student with a documented disability who requires an academic accommodation, please contact the Office of Student Life Services at 410-955-3034 or via email at dss@jhsph.edu.