PRINCPLES OF GENETIC EPIDEMIOLOGY 3 Syllabus

340.733.01 | AY 2013-2014 - 3rd Term | 3 Credit(s)
TTh 9:00:00 AM
  • Contact Information
    Faculty
    Terri Beaty
    Alison Klein
  • Course Learning Objectives

    Upon successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Explain how family data can be used to test for genetic control of a disease or phenotype
    • Estimate familial correlations for quantitative phenotypes from family data
    • Use currently available software to check for structural errors in family data, estimate allele frequencies, check for Mendelian inconsistencies and describe familial aggregation of both qualitative and quantitative phenotypes
    • Explain how models of inheritance are fit to family data and interpret published articles on segregation analysis of complex phenotypes
    • Explain what linkage analysis means, and the relationship between meiotic recombination, crossing over, genetic distance and mapping functions
    • Interpret published articles on parametric or model based linkage analysis for both qualitative and quantitative phenotypes
    • Use currently available software to estimate recombination fraction from informative multiplex families and test for linkage between a single marker and a disease phenotype using maximum likelihood methods
    • Use currently available software to estimate the map position of an unobserved trait locus and a fixed framework map of multiple markers to map genes
    • Explain how variance components models can be used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) that are used to map genes for quantitative phenotypes
    • Interpret and critically evaluate non-parametric or model free methods for linkage analysis of complex phenotypes
  • Course Description
    Brings together the principles of linkage, association and sequence analysis introduced in the first two terms and builds up the students’ skills in applying and interpreting methods for such studies. Introduces advanced analytical methods in genetic epidemiology and illustrates their application using current software tools. Adds depth to the students’ understanding by critiquing example papers from the recent literature, and students develop and design a research project incorporating these methods. Some material is offered as recorded lectures to free up class time for interactive discussion of analytical issues and examples from the literature.

    Additional Faculty Notes:

    Course description:           This course will bring together the principles of linkage, association and sequence analysis introduced in the first two terms and build up the students’ skills in applying and interpreting methods for such studies.  We will cover advanced analytical methods in genetic epidemiology and illustrate their application using current software tools.  We will add depth to the students understanding by critiquing example papers from the recent literature, and the students will develop and design a research project incorporating these methods. Some material will be offered as recorded lectures to free up class time for interactive discussion of analytical issues and examples from the literature.

  • Intended Audience
    Doctoral and Masters students in Epidemiology & Biostatistics.

    Additional Faculty Notes:

    Target audience: School of public health students interested in genetic epidemiology; graduate students in biomedical research.

     

    Recommended audience: Epidemiology, biostatistics graduate students interested in genetic epidemiology

  • Methods of Assessment
    Computer-based homework assignments and written critiques of relevant articles from the scientific literature.

    Additional Faculty Notes:

    Method of student evaluation: Students will be evaluated through graded homework assignments based on computer exercises (50%), and design of research project proposal that incorporating these analytical tools into a study of a complex phenotype with student presentation (50%)

  • Prerequisites
    140.621-622 or 140.651-652; (2 courses in biostatistics and the first 2 courses in Genetic Epidemiology 340.721 & 340.722)

    Additional Faculty Notes:

    Previous courses or experience in genetic epidemiology are required.  Recommended 340.731 & 340.732

  • Required Text(s)

    Additional Faculty Notes:

    No specific text is required.  Relevant books are available for 24 hour loans.

  • Course Schedule

    Please see the course Session for a full list of dates and items for this course.

  • Academic Ethics Code

    Students enrolled in the Bloomberg School of Public Health of The Johns Hopkins University assume an obligation to conduct themselves in a manner appropriate to the University's mission as an institution of higher education. A student is obligated to refrain from acts which he or she knows, or under the circumstances has reason to know, impair the academic integrity of the University. Violations of academic integrity include, but are not limited to: cheating; plagiarism; knowingly furnishing false information to any agent of the University for inclusion in the academic record; violation of the rights and welfare of animal or human subjects in research; and misconduct as a member of either School or University committees or recognized groups or organizations.

  • Welcome Message

    We meet in 2017 School of Public Health, Tuesdays & Thursdays 9-10:20am

  • Course Objectives(from old syllabus)

    Course learning objectives: After taking this class, the student will be able to read and interpret papers using linkage and association analysis in genetic epidemiology.  They will be able to initiate data analysis using current software tools.  The students will understand how genomic sequence data can be incorporated into genetic epidemiology studies to identify genes controlling complex phenotypes.

     

  • Disability Support Services
    If you are a student with a documented disability who requires an academic accommodation, please contact the Office of Student Life Services at 410-955-3034 or via email at dss@jhsph.edu.