COMPARATIVE HEALTH INSURANCE Syllabus

309.670.01 | AY 2013-2014 - 3rd Term | 3 Credit(s)
MW 3:30:00 PM
  • Contact Information
    Faculty
    Gerard Anderson
  • Course Learning Objectives

    After completing this course, you should be able to:

    • 1) To understand the financing flows underpinning the delivery of health care services across various countries; 2) To know the differences in financing and organizing health care services among countries at different levels of income and development; 3) To understand various pooling arrangements and the rationale for each; 4) To understand alternative roles for government in the health sector; 5) To understand the options for coordinating financing and service provision between the public and private sectors; 6) To be able to make informed recommendations for how countries could reform their health sectors; and, 7) To conduct an analysis of a particular issue in comparative health insurance.
  • Course Description
    Reviews the organization and financing of health systems in middle and high-income countries – focusing on population coverage, in terms of both how different groups are covered and the benefits package provided. Begins with a conceptual framework of financing flows in the health sector, and proceeds to identify a series of topics and case studies as the subject of specific lectures. Explores in depth the principal models for population coverage – including national health insurance, national health service, social insurance, private insurance, and mixed hybrid models. Provides case studies of health insurance coverage in specific countries, including the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Japan, Taiwan, Chile – with lessons drawn for transitional countries interested in expanding health insurance coverage.

    Additional Faculty Notes:

    This course provides an overview of the methods of financing and delivering health care services in middle- and high-income countries. The course is also relevant for low-income countries as they are starting to experience some of the same concerns as middle- and high-income countries.

    This course is relevant to students who want to conduct research in comparative health systems; who are considering working for international aid agencies; who expect to work with international aid agencies; or are just interested in how other health systems are organized.

    The principal models for health insurance coverage – including national health insurance, national health service, social insurance, private insurance, and mixed hybrid models – are explored. The course then examines how the funds are distributed, how providers are paid, and how services are delivered.

    Specific topics that will be discussed include:

    • Role of government in health financing and service delivery;
    • Alternative sources of revenue for the health sector – including taxation, premiums, and out-of-pocket payments;
    • Roles for private insurance;
    • Alternative pooling arrangements – how revenues are combined for health insurance coverage;
    • Health care coverage;
    • Purchasing arrangements;
    • Provider organization;
    • Provider payment mechanisms;
    • Performance of different health care systems; and
    • Specific examples from various low, middle, and high income countries organize their health care systems.
  • Intended Audience
    masters and doctoral students with a focus on health systems financing and coverage
  • Methods of Assessment

    paper, final exam and class participation

    Additional Faculty Notes:

    1. Short paper -20% -Due by 3:30pm on Wednesday, February 12 to CoursePlus DropBox
    2. Quiz – 20%. To be completed in class on March 3. The quiz will be short answer questions on the lectures and readings.
    3. Final paper outline 10% - Paper Outline: due by 3:30pm on Wednesday, February 19 to CoursePlus DropBox
    4. Final Paper – 50%. Paper Due March 12 at 3:30 pm in Course Plus Drop Box

     

     

  • Prerequisites

    Additional Faculty Notes:

    There are no pre-requisites for this course.  This course is open to Master's and Doctoral-level students only.

  • Required Text(s)

    Additional Faculty Notes:

    No textbooks are required for this course.  Readings will be posted to Courseplus.

  • Course Schedule

    Please see the course Session for a full list of dates and items for this course.

  • Academic Ethics Code

    Students enrolled in the Bloomberg School of Public Health of The Johns Hopkins University assume an obligation to conduct themselves in a manner appropriate to the University's mission as an institution of higher education. A student is obligated to refrain from acts which he or she knows, or under the circumstances has reason to know, impair the academic integrity of the University. Violations of academic integrity include, but are not limited to: cheating; plagiarism; knowingly furnishing false information to any agent of the University for inclusion in the academic record; violation of the rights and welfare of animal or human subjects in research; and misconduct as a member of either School or University committees or recognized groups or organizations.

  • Welcome Message

    Class will be held during the third term on Mondays and Wednesdays from 3:30pm-4:50pm from January 23 to March 13. 

  • Contact Information(from old syllabus)

    Cristian Baeza, MD, MPH

    Afsan Bhadelia (TA)
    Email: abhadeli@jhsph.edu

  • Course Objectives(from old syllabus)

    By the end of this course, you should be able to:

    1. understand the financing flows underpinning the delivery of health care services across various countries;
    2. know the differences in financing and organizing health care services among countries at different levels of income and development;
    3. understand various pooling arrangements and the rationale for each;
    4. understand alternative roles for government in the health sector;
    5. understand the options for coordinating financing and service provision between the public and private sectors;
    6. make informed recommendations for how countries could reform their health sectors; and,
    7. conduct an analysis of a particular issue in comparative health insurance
  • Disability Support Services
    If you are a student with a documented disability who requires an academic accommodation, please contact the Office of Student Life Services at 410-955-3034 or via email at dss@jhsph.edu.