MARKETING IN HEALTH CARE ORGANIZATIONS Syllabus

312.660.01 | AY 2013-2014 - 3rd Term | 3 Credit(s)
M 5:30:00 PM
  • Contact Information
    Faculty
    Greg Conderacci
  • Course Learning Objectives

    Upon successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Explain the purpose and value of the marketing function within a healthcare organization.
    • Analyze trends within the industry and society and how to take best advantage of them
    • Apply modern marketing tools to analyze markets and to attract or influence people within them
    • Create an effective marketing plan
    • Employ group decision-making dynamics in class setting
    • Create an effective mission for an organization or a person
    • Explain the role and responsibilities of a marketing professional in the health sector
    • Describe the differences between sales, public relations and marketing and appreciate the essential role of each in a comprehensive marketing strategy
    • Develop a marketing plan for a specific product, service or program
    • Demonstrate basic sales techniques like questioning, listening, needs assessment, objection resolution, and positioning
    • Create an effective sales presentation
  • Course Description
    Introduces students to marketing concepts in health care through readings, guest speakers, small group exercises and individual study. Students learn how to conduct a situational analysis, understanding the market and consumer behavior as well as assessing the capabilities of the organization. Explores primary and secondary market research techniques. Discusses marketing strategy, including positioning and branding, program/service development, pricing, distribution, and promotion. Evaluation and measurement methods are explained.
  • Intended Audience
    MHA and DrPH students; MPH and certificate students interested in the marketing of health care organizations
  • Methods of Assessment
    written and group assignments; homework; class participation; final presentation
  • Course Schedule

    Please see the course Session for a full list of dates and items for this course.

  • Academic Ethics Code

    Students enrolled in the Bloomberg School of Public Health of The Johns Hopkins University assume an obligation to conduct themselves in a manner appropriate to the University's mission as an institution of higher education. A student is obligated to refrain from acts which he or she knows, or under the circumstances has reason to know, impair the academic integrity of the University. Violations of academic integrity include, but are not limited to: cheating; plagiarism; knowingly furnishing false information to any agent of the University for inclusion in the academic record; violation of the rights and welfare of animal or human subjects in research; and misconduct as a member of either School or University committees or recognized groups or organizations.

  • Course Syllabus

    Johns Hopkins University

    Bloomberg School of Public Health

    Department of Health Policy and Management

    3rd Term 2013-2014

     

    Marketing in Health Care Organizations  312.660.01

     

    Instructor Contact Information

    Greg Conderacci

    Good Ground Consulting LLC

    8171 Pleasant Plains

    Towson, MD 21286

    443-756-8213

    gc@goggc.com

    gcondera@jhsph.edu

     

    Office Hours: By appointment

     

    Teaching Assistant

     

    Ashna Saxena

    asaxena@jhsph.edu

     

    1.  COURSE OVERVIEW

     

    Course Description

    Introduces students to marketing concepts in health care through readings, guest speakers, small group exercises and individual study. Students learn how to conduct a situational analysis,  understanding the market and consumer behavior as well as assessing the capabilities of the organization. Explores primary and secondary market research techniques. Discusses marketing strategy, including positioning and branding, program/service development, pricing, distribution, and promotion.  Evaluation and measurement methods are explained.

     

    Combines both theory and its application to every day situations.  The approach of the course will be to reinforce key marketing concepts through both organizational and personal examples.  The course goal is to develop a broad knowledge base and appreciation for the importance of well done marketing plans and strategies.

     

    Over the course of their careers, health care executives can experience marketing as:

    • Leaders who must use the tools of marketing to exert their influence, describe their ideas, and create missions and visions for populations, organizations and teams
    • Executives who must rely on marketing professionals to help them “sell” ideas, products or services
    • Marketing officers responsible for planning and executing strategies and policies
    • Professionals who contribute directly to the marketing process.

     

    Whether you become a user, director or producer of marketing – or all three – an understanding of its tools and tricks will be central to your success. This course explores many marketing models -- their strengths and weaknesses as well as their uses and abuses – so that you will understand the difference. 

     

    Here’s a little philosophy about marketing and learning: they both should be fun.  If you cannot see marketing all around you – cajoling, tempting, and twisting your arm – you are doomed to be its victim. It’s my job to help you internalize what you learn here through your participation in class, your assignments, and conversations with me if you like.

     

     Learning Objectives:

     

    • Explain the purpose and value of the marketing function within a healthcare organization.
    • Analyze trends within the industry and society and how to take best advantage of them
    • Apply modern marketing tools to analyze markets and to attract or influence people within them 
    • Create an effective marketing plan.
    • Employ group decision-making dynamics in class setting
    • Create an effective mission for an organization or a person
    • Explain the role and responsibilities of a marketing professional in the health sector
    • Describe the differences between sales, public relations and marketing and appreciate the essential role of each in a comprehensive marketing strategy
    • Develop a marketing plan for a specific product, service or program
    • Demonstrate basic sales techniques like questioning, listening, needs assessment, objection resolution, and positioning
    • Create an effective “sales” presentation

     

     

     

    Prerequisites:  There are no prerequisites for this course

     

     

    Intended Audience:  Required for MHA and DrPH in Leadership and Management.  MPH Leadership and Management Concentration, MPH/MBA, and others on a space availability basis.

     

     

     

     

     

               

     

    Methods of Student Evaluation

     

    Even though this is a marketing class, a subject you may consider “soft,” you will find that it can be quite challenging.  For many students, the “hard” part of the course is class participation.  Read the material and think about it.  As Socrates said, “I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think.” Although your participation should be based upon analytical reasoning, creative problem-solving, thoroughness, and an understanding of assignment content, for Pete’s sake take a few risks and say what you think.  I like people who take intelligent risks, don’t you? I also like folks who ask questions. Makes the world go ‘round, you know.

     

    In terms of class participation, you will meet expectations as long as you are present and on time for each class, do your homework thoughtfully, ask good questions occasionally, and participate in the class exercises.  You will exceed expectations if you do those things and are consistently very well prepared, ask great questions, fully engage in group discussions and exercises – and even challenge the teacher and each other from time to time.  You will not meet expectations if you miss classes or assignments, or show up late, or sit silently during class discussions.

     

    If you don’t show up for class or don’t participate, you are depriving yourself and your classmates.  If you cannot be in class, please e-mail the course assistant who will be taking attendance. Much of what you will learn in this course will happen in class and in doing your assignments. There are only seven class sessions so if you miss more than one session, you’re out of the course. Out of courtesy to me and your fellow students, please arrive on time and stay for the entire class.  Marketing is about the message you send;  if you show up late you are sending a bad message….in class and in your career.

     

    It is very difficult to “make up” for a missed class. If you miss a class, you are expected to obtain, from a colleague, notes on classroom activities, handouts, and other materials provided during class, and all information pertaining to assignments and other activities.    A good rule of thumb is to spend at least three hours outside of class in preparation for every hour spent in class.  Of course, you have to read the assigned sections of the textbook.

     

    Your grades will be based on written assignments, class participation [as an individual and as a member of a group] homework assignments and a final individual presentation.

     

    Class Participation                                                             15%                       

    Assignment #1: Analyzing an Advertisement                        10%           

    Assignment #2: The Marketing Plan                                    25%

    Assignment #3: Logo and Tagline                                    15%

    Assignment #4: The Pitch                                                35%                                   

     

    Class participation, both individual and in groups, is a critical part of the course.  A portion of a student’s grade will be determined by the degree to which he/she participates in the class discussion. Absences and tardiness count against class participation. During class cell phones, blackberries and other electronic devices, including laptops and iPads may NOT be used.

     

     

    Required Textbook

     

    Strategic Marketing for Health Care Organizations by Philip Kotler, Joel Shalowitz and Robert Stevens.  In addition, from time to time, case studies and other reading material may be posted on the course plus site.  We will discuss in class if and when other materials are posted for required reading.

     

     

    1.  COURSE REQUIREMENTS

     

    Description of Each Graded Course Assignment

     

    A word or two about assignments. Hopkins’ standards for written work are likely to be different than the standards expected in your workplace or in a professional marketing situation.  Grading standards for all papers will include appropriate use of standard English, coherency, organization, and clarity.  Please take advantage of spell-checks and grammar-checks. Yes, just like in the real world, spelling counts.  Your final grade will be determined on the basis of your use of the tools discussed in class, as well as your experience and creativity.  

     

    Often, in marketing as in life, shorter is both better and harder.  The assignments are not designed to be long, as in many pages.  But they are expected to be good.  They are due at the start of class. You may bring them in hard copy or submit them in advance electronically.  If they are not submitted by the start of class, they are penalized a grade level (e.g., an “A” paper becomes a “B”). 

     

    Class participation is rated according to your contribution to the class, not whether you can parrot back what the books says.  Do you ask good questions?  Do you help your fellow students in group exercises? Do you have brilliant insights and creative ideas?  Quality is paramount, but it is better to play the whole season and bat .300 than to come up to the plate once and hit a homerun.  

     

    Assignment #1: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly

     

    According to Kotler, marketing helps “participants in the health care system

    create, communicate, and deliver value (CCDV) to their respective target markets.

    Modern marketers start with the customers rather than with the products or services;

    they are more interested in building a lasting relationship than in securing a single

    transaction. Their aim is to create a high level of satisfaction so that customers come

    back to the same supplier.”

     

    Your assignment is to find PRINT advertisements for any health-care-related product, service or organization that:

    • Are “Good” -- excellent examples of this statement
    • Are “Bad” --  excellent examples of the opposite of this statement
    • Are “Ugly” -- true to the Kotler ideal describe above, but are just plain poorly done.

     

    Pick one example of each and explain why you chose it.  Maximum: 300 words of explanation – TOTAL for all three.  No TV, radio or Youtube videos.

     

    Assignment #2: Your Tagline and Logo

     

    Design two of the most basic – and challenging – building blocks of your brand.  Come up with a logo and a tagline for your organization, yourself, or a health-related product or service of your choice. 

     

    You may sketch the logo or use clip art elements.  The emphasis is NOT on quality of design, but on the concept.  The logo and the tagline should reinforce each other and support the ideas in your marketing plan, Assignment 3 below. Draw the logo, write the tagline, and then, in not more than 200 words, explain why you chose them.

     

    Assignment #3: Your Marketing Plan

     

    Using the tools you have learned about in class (mission, SWOT, PESTs, Trust Formula, value propositions, etc.), do a “quick and dirty” marketing plan for your organization, yourself, or a health-related product or service of your choice (the same as in #2 above).  Use Kotler pp 141-143 as your guide or the “Good Ground” outline discussed in class.  No more than two pages.  Use bullets.  Cut to the chase.

     

    The subject of these exercises will be the basis for the final pitch: choose carefully.

     

    Assignment #4: The Pitch

     

    For the final class, come prepared to do short (not more than five-minutes) presentation on your organization, yourself or the heath-care-related product or service you have been working on all semester.  The presentation will be videotaped.  The presentation will consist of PowerPoint slides and will be evaluated as follows:

     

    1. Is the presentation clear? (10 points)                                                                                                            _____
    2. Is it compelling (would you invest in it/hire the person, etc.)?  (10 points)                  _____
    3. Is it interesting (did you enjoy sitting through it)? (10 points)                                    _____
    4. Is it attractive (good slide layout)? (10 points)                                                                        _____
    5. Did you (the listener) like it? (10 points)                                                                                          _____
    6. The slides (10 points each)
      1. Title (Interesting? Have key information?)                                                                        _____
      2. Problem (Clear? Worth solving?)                                                                                          _____
      3. Solution (Convincing? Realistic?)                                                                                          _____
      4. Magic (What’s special?)                                                                                                            _____
      5. Marketing (How will you sell it?)                                                                                          _____

     

     

    Although all students will have to present in front of their groups, not all videos will be debriefed in front of the entire class.  The students will present to smaller groups where they will also evaluate each other.  A few videos will be selected randomly for more intensive discussion by the entire class. 

     

     

    Academic Integrity

    Students are obligated to refrain from acts that they know, or under the circumstances have reason to know, will impair the academic integrity of the University.  Violations of academic integrity include, but are not limited to: cheating: plagiarism: unapproved multiple submissions: knowingly furnishing false or incomplete information to any agent of the university for inclusion in the academic records; and falsification, forgery, alteration, destruction, or misuse of official university documents or seal.

    The code, discussed in the Policy and Procedure Memorandum for Students, March 31, 2002, will be adhered to in this class:

    Students enrolled in the Bloomberg School of Public Health of The Johns Hopkins University assume an obligation to conduct themselves in a manner appropriate to the University's mission as an institution of higher education. A student is obligated to refrain from acts which he or she knows, or under the circumstances has reason to know, impair the academic integrity of the University. Violations of academic integrity include, but are not limited to: cheating; plagiarism; knowingly furnishing false information to any agent of the University for inclusion in the academic record; violation of the rights and welfare of animal or human subjects in research; and misconduct as a member of either School or University committees or recognized groups or organizations.

    Disability Support Services:
    If you are a student with a documented disability who requires an academic accommodation, please contact Betty H. Addison in the Office of Career Services and Disability Support:  dss@jhsph.edu, 410-955-3034, 2017 W. Monument Street.  HTTP://www.jhsph.edu/offices -and-services/student -affairs/diability/

     

     

     

    III.   CLASS SCHEDULE, AGENDA AND READINGS

     

    Course Agenda

     

    Session

    Topics

    Readings and Assignments

    Jan 27

     

    What is Healthcare Marketing?

    • Why market?
    • Key concepts
    • Why it’s different
    • Why it’s the same
    • The changing environment
    • Your future roles

    Pre-course Reading

    Kotler, Chapters 1-3

     

     

    Group activity: Designing the “Ultimate Health Care Experience”

    Feb 3

    Who is “buying” what? Why?

    • Motivation and decision-making
    • What are YOU selling?
    • The role of trust

    Reading:

    Kotler, Chapters, 4, 6

     

    Assignment #1 Due:  The Good, The Bad and The Ugly

     

    Group activity: What are YOU selling?

     

    Feb 10

    What is marketing strategy?

    • The role of the “mission”
    • What are you REALLY selling?
    • Reaching target audiences
    • SWOTs, PESTs and other tools
    • YOUR mission

    Reading:

    Kotler, Chapters 5, 7, 8

    Group Activity: Writing your mission

     

    Assignments #2 & #3 – due next week…you should have substantial work done on them already!

     

     

    Feb 17

    What is a brand?

    • Why it matters
    • Brand elements
    • YOUR brand

    What are the key theories of pricing, packaging and product?

    • Products and services
    • Payors and their practices

     

     

    Reading:

    Kotler, Chapters, 9, 10, 11

     

    Assignments #2 & #3 Due: Your Tagline, Logo and Strategy

     

    Group activity: Buffing your brand

    Feb 24

    What is effective communication?

    • PR & advertising
    • Positioning
    • Taglines and elevators speeches
    • YOUR elevator

    Reading:

    Kotler,  Chapters 12, 13

     

     

    Group activity: Crafting “elevator speeches”

    Mar 3

    How should we sell?

    • Understanding needs
    • Features and benefits
    • The power of questioning
    • Dealing with objections

     

    Reading:

    Kotler, Chapter 14

     

    Assignment #4 Due next week!  You should have a draft of your PowerPoints done!

    Mar 10

    Class Presentations

    Assignment #4 Due: Presenting Your “Pitch”

     

     

     

     

    IV.   MHA Program Learning Objectives and Competency Grid

     

    Learning Objectives

    Competencies

    Evaluation and Learning Activities

    Explain the purpose and value of the marketing function within a healthcare organization.

     

    IIID. Strategic Management: the ability to use strategic management models and tools in the analysis, planning, decision making and development of organizational goals and objectives

     

    Working in teams in class, create mini-marketing strategies for the “Ultimate Health Care Experience,” defend them and critique each other.

    Analyze trends within the industry and society and how to take best advantage of them

    IC. Market Analysis: the ability to apply economic models to analyze, understand and plan in response to and anticipation of health care sector events, developments and trends

     

    In facilitated class discussions, students will be challenged to use models to analyze health care sector developments both in general and in their specific jobs.

    Apply modern marketing tools to analyze markets and to attract or influence people within them 

    IC. Market Analysis

     

    Both in class and in their written assignments, students will use a variety of marketing tools and concepts to prepare and evaluate their concepts and strategies.

    Create an effective marketing plan.

    IIID. Strategic Management

     

     

    Throughout the course, the students are assembling, one component at a time, a marketing plan for themselves, their organizations or a product or service of their own choosing.  The final assignment is a synthesis of this work. They are evaluated both on the content and the delivery –  two key  factors of marketing.

    Employ group decision-making dynamics in class setting

    IVC. Collaboration:  the ability to work with colleagues or staff and identify a team’s shared purpose or goal, work effectively with others,  demonstrate enthusiasm for a collaborative solution, give others a sense of control and autonomy.

     

    Each class session includes exercises in which students will work together to create key marketing elements (see “Buffing your brand” and “Crafting elevator speeches” above).  In doing so, they will simulate the types of discussions that marketing professionals employ to generate these elements in the field.

    Create an effective mission for an organization or a person

    IIIE. Innovation and Creativity: the ability to identify opportunities and to improve systems and procedures, and offer new ideas.

    Students will generate “personal missions” – the fundamental building block of branding – and then work to apply them.

    Explain the role and responsibilities of a marketing professional in the health sector

     

     

     

    IIIF. Influence: the ability to effectively promote ideas and help shape the opinions of others.

    IVB. Relationship and Network Management: the ability to develop and maintain cooperative relationships and build networks with people who might assist in the achievement of organizational goals

    IIIJ. Written Communication: the ability to clearly and effectively communicate ideas and information in writing

    IIIK. Oral Communication: the ability to clearly and effectively organize and communicate information in informal discussions and formal presentations

    IIIL. Public Presentation:  the ability to delivers clear, persuasive and organized presentations

     

    The class exercises and homework assignments are designed to mirror the same activities commonly practiced in the field.  Students will be expected to create and “sell” their ideas to their peers, both orally and in writing, both in informal class “skull sessions” and in a formal presentation.

    Describe the differences between sales, public relations and marketing and appreciate the essential role of each in a comprehensive marketing strategy

     

    IIID. Strategic Management

    Not only will the students learn these roles in class, they will be using some of the techniques of each in their assignments and class exercises. For example, see the group activity “What are you selling?” above.

    Develop a marketing plan for a specific product, service or program

     

    IC. Market Analysis

    IIID. Strategic Management

    This is the essence of the final assignment, as outlined above.

    Demonstrate basic sales techniques like questioning, listening, needs assessment, objection resolution, and positioning

    IIIM Communication

    IVA. Interpersonal understanding: the ability to listen effectively and empathetically in order to understand and identify with others’ interests, concerns and needs

    Not only will the students learn these roles in class, they will be using some of the techniques of each in their assignments and class exercises. For example, see the group activity “What are you selling?” above.

    Create an effective “sales” presentation

    IIIM Communication

    IIIJ. Written Communication IIIK. Oral Communication

    IIIL. Public Presentation

    IIIH. Influence

    IIIF. Leadership: the willingness and ability to take charge and initiate action toward achieving organizational goals.

     

    Presenting the marketing plan, as outlined above, is effectively a “sales presentation.”

     

  • Disability Support Services
    If you are a student with a documented disability who requires an academic accommodation, please contact the Office of Student Life Services at 410-955-3034 or via email at dss@jhsph.edu.