CHILDREN IN CRISIS: AN ASSET-BASED APPROACH TO WORKING WITH VULNERABLE YOUTH Syllabus

221.640.01 | AY 2013-2014 - 4th Term | 3 Credit(s)
T 5:30:00 PM
  • Contact Information
    Faculty
    Gilbert Burnham
    Coordinator
    Jordan White
  • Course Learning Objectives

    Upon successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Describe the social, political and economic conditions that place children in crisis situations and perpetuate their at-risk status
    • Demonstrate how to utilize an asset-based community development model
    • Define and apply the concept of allophilia as it relates to service learning, community engagement and youth programming
    • Identify similarities/differences between vulnerable youth circumstances in Baltimore and those in another part of the world while observing the global relevance of working in Baltimor
    • Recognize best practices in youth interventions from across contexts and explain ways to develop culturally responsible plans to help children currently experiencing crises
    • Investigate the use of youth voices and personal narratives in the development and improvement of youth programming, and as a supplement to traditional analytical and academic training at JHSPH
    • Inform, improve, and/or develop a project requested by the community organization by engaging directly with the youth to capture their perspectives and input
    • Develop a personal approach to working across cultures in the global context and in Baltimore by identifying personal tendencies, stereotypes, strengths and challenges.
    • Integrate one’s learning through the course towards motivations for intellectual, career, and volunteer pursuits
  • Course Description

    This 3-credit service-learning seminar uses personal narratives, experienced practitioners, community members and direct youth engagement to expose students to a range of domestic and international youth welfare issues and interventions focused on violence, juvenile justice, education, child protection, and refugee resettlement. Utilizing an asset-based approach, the class highlights commonalities between international and domestic youth challenges. Class sessions feature discussion, youth voices, expert lectures and examination of existing programs.

     

        

  • Intended Audience

    MPH students in Humanitarian Assistance and Child Health Concentration areas, other MPH students, MHS, DrPH and PhD students in HPM and IH.

    Additional Faculty Notes:

     

    Consent required for undergraduates.  Undergraduate consent will not be granted until the first day of class.  Interested undergraduate students are encouraged to attend the first day. For consent, contact: Jordan White (jowhite@jhsph.edu).

  • Methods of Assessment

    Student Evaluation 

    • Class attendance and participation 25 %
    • Paper Assignment 1 25%
    • Paper Assignment 2 25%
    • Weekly Current Events and Policy Review 25%
  • Course Schedule

    Please see the course Session for a full list of dates and items for this course.

  • Files from the Online Library
  • Academic Ethics Code

    Students enrolled in the Bloomberg School of Public Health of The Johns Hopkins University assume an obligation to conduct themselves in a manner appropriate to the University's mission as an institution of higher education. A student is obligated to refrain from acts which he or she knows, or under the circumstances has reason to know, impair the academic integrity of the University. Violations of academic integrity include, but are not limited to: cheating; plagiarism; knowingly furnishing false information to any agent of the University for inclusion in the academic record; violation of the rights and welfare of animal or human subjects in research; and misconduct as a member of either School or University committees or recognized groups or organizations.

  • Welcome Message

    This 3-credit seminar uses personal narratives, experienced practitioners, community members and direct youth engagement to expose students to a range of domestic and international youth welfare issues and interventions focused on violence, juvenile justice, education, child protection, and refugee resettlement.

     

    Class Components

    Each class session will include:

    • Review and discussion of current events related to vulnerable youth in the U.S and aborad
    • Background presentations
    • Personal testimony/narrative from adult/youth speaker has experienced the issue
    • Presentation from a program that has been successful to address the issue
    • Class discussion with program and individual panelists

     

  • Course topics

     

     

    Date

    Topic

    Speakers

    March 25

    Introduction

    Gilbert Burnham and Jordan White

    April 1

    Refugee youth resettlement

    Refugee Youth Project

    April 8

    TBD

     

    April 15

    Youth Violence

    Safe Streets

    April 22

    Educatioanal Disparities

    Child Protection 

    Big Brothers, Big Sisters

    Kate McAlpine, Caucus for Childrens Rights

    April 29

    Refugee youth resettlement

    Jill Pardini, Soccer Without Borders

    May 6

    Juvenile Justice

    Educational Disparities

    Maryland Department of Juvenile Services

    Daniella Lewy, Harvard Graduate School of Education

    May 13

    Final Presentations

    Practicum Student Presentations & Paper 2 Due**

     

  • Disability Support Services
    If you are a student with a documented disability who requires an academic accommodation, please contact the Office of Student Life Services at 410-955-3034 or via email at dss@jhsph.edu.