ASSESSING EPIDEMIOLOGIC IMPACT OF HUMAN RIGHTS VIOLATIONS Syllabus

340.639.01 | AY 2013-2014 - 4th Term | 2 Credit(s)
TTh 1:30:00 PM
  • Contact Information
    Faculty
    Chris Beyrer
  • Course Learning Objectives

    Upon successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Explain the mechanisms through which policies and rights abrogations can worsen epidemics, of the benefits of using a rights-based approach to public health problems, and of current epidemiologic tools to study these complex issues
  • Course Description
    Since human rights violations and failed public policies can affect the health of populations and the efficacy of public health efforts, students utilize a case studies approach drawn from recent epidemics of infectious diseases to investigate the interactions of epidemics, public health, and human rights. In the context of the case studies, students examine epidemiologic methods to investigate and understand these interactions, including qualitative assessments and interview approaches, population level measures, indirect measures for use in conflict areas, and new tools of molecular epidemiology. Case studies include the stalled response to SARS in China; HIV/AIDS in Burma under military rule; HIV, STIs, and violence in relation to human trafficking and sex work; limitations on effective HIV prevention for drug users in Russia, the CIS and China; and the policies of limiting condom availability for prisoners in the US, Russia, and Thailand. Students gain an appreciation for the mecha

    Additional Faculty Notes:

    Since human rights violations and failed public policies can affect the health of populations and the efficacy of public health efforts, students utilize a case studies approach drawn from recent epidemics of infectious diseases to investigate the interactions of epidemics, public health, and human rights. In the context of the case studies, students examine epidemiologic methods to investigate and understand these interactions, including qualitative assessments and interview approaches, population level measures, indirect measures for use in conflict areas, and new tools of molecular epidemiology. Case studies include the stalled response to cholera in Zimbabwe; HIV/AIDS in Burma under military rule; HIV, STIs, and violence in relation to human trafficking and sex work; limitations on effective HIV prevention for drug users in Russia, the CIS and China; and the policies of limiting condom availability for prisoners in the US, Russia, and Thailand. Students gain an appreciation for the mechanisms through which policies and rights abrogation can worsen epidemics, of the benefits of using a rights-based approach to public health problems, and of current epidemiologic tools to study these complex interactions.

  • Intended Audience
    Epidemiology and certificate students.

    Additional Faculty Notes:

    Individuals who are interested in using the rights-based approach to advocate for various public health problems that our global community is confronted with in the 21st century.

  • Methods of Assessment

    In class exercises, paper

    Additional Faculty Notes:
    The final grade will be a combination of class participation/attendance (33%), the short paper assignment (67%).

     

    Attendance:  

    Because the course is built upon the stimulating interactions among faculty, presenters, and students; therefore, students’ attendance and participation are extremely important.  In order to facilitate an enriched classroom setting, we encourage and expect that all students to come to class having completed required/suggested readings.  

     

     

     

     

  • Required Text(s)

    Additional Faculty Notes:

    Recommended Text:

     

    Chris Beyrer & HF Pizer. Public Health & Human Rights: Evidence-Based Approaches. Johns Hopkins Univ Press.  2007; ISBN-10:0-8018-8647-3.

     

    *Available at Matthews Johns Hopkins BookCenter

  • Course Schedule

    Please see the course Session for a full list of dates and items for this course.

  • Academic Ethics Code

    Students enrolled in the Bloomberg School of Public Health of The Johns Hopkins University assume an obligation to conduct themselves in a manner appropriate to the University's mission as an institution of higher education. A student is obligated to refrain from acts which he or she knows, or under the circumstances has reason to know, impair the academic integrity of the University. Violations of academic integrity include, but are not limited to: cheating; plagiarism; knowingly furnishing false information to any agent of the University for inclusion in the academic record; violation of the rights and welfare of animal or human subjects in research; and misconduct as a member of either School or University committees or recognized groups or organizations.

  • Contact Information

    TA: Andrea Wirtz
    Email: awirtz@jhsph.edu

  • Disability Support Services
    If you are a student with a documented disability who requires an academic accommodation, please contact the Office of Student Life Services at 410-955-3034 or via email at dss@jhsph.edu.