ECONOMIC EVALUATION III Syllabus

313.632.01 | AY 2013-2014 - 4th Term | 3 Credit(s)
WF 10:30:00 AM
  • Contact Information
    Faculty
    John Bridges
  • Course Learning Objectives

    Upon successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Describe a variety of stated-preference method and how they might be used in economic evaluation to inform health policy, both in the US and internationally
    • Appropriately use stated-preference methods to create policy-relevant metrics, including estimating healthy-years-equivalents (HYE), maximal-acceptable risk (MAR), and willingness-to-pay (WTP).
    • Independently design, implement, analyze and report on an application of stated-preference methods to a policy-relevant topic in public health.
  • Course Description
    Provides students with an overview of the increasingly important role of stated-preference methods within economic evaluation. Specifically focuses on the measurement of the priorities and preferences of patients and other stakeholders in public health and demonstrates how results can be used to inform policy – both in the US and internationally. Introduces students to a range of stated-preference methods (including conjoint analysis, discrete-choice experiments, best-worst scaling and contingent valuation) and will explore modern approaches for developing policy-relevant metrics, including estimating healthy-years-equivalents (HYE), maximal-acceptable risk (MAR), and willingness-to-pay (WTP). Students develop a working knowledge of these methods through a diverse set of case studies, brief assignments and a group project.
  • Intended Audience
    MHS and PhD students along with MPH interested in this topic area
  • Methods of Assessment
    Brief assignments and a written report/presentation of their group project that will see them design, implement, analyze and report on an application of a stated-preference method to a policy-relevant topic.
  • Prerequisites
    313.631, Economic Evaluation II
  • Course Schedule

    Please see the course Session for a full list of dates and items for this course.

  • Academic Ethics Code

    Students enrolled in the Bloomberg School of Public Health of The Johns Hopkins University assume an obligation to conduct themselves in a manner appropriate to the University's mission as an institution of higher education. A student is obligated to refrain from acts which he or she knows, or under the circumstances has reason to know, impair the academic integrity of the University. Violations of academic integrity include, but are not limited to: cheating; plagiarism; knowingly furnishing false information to any agent of the University for inclusion in the academic record; violation of the rights and welfare of animal or human subjects in research; and misconduct as a member of either School or University committees or recognized groups or organizations.

  • Disability Support Services
    If you are a student with a documented disability who requires an academic accommodation, please contact the Office of Student Life Services at 410-955-3034 or via email at dss@jhsph.edu.