FACILITATING FAMILY ADAPTATION TO LOSS AND DISABILITY II Syllabus

415.651.92 | AY 2013-2014 - 2nd Term | 2 Credit(s)
F 9:00:00 AM
  • Contact Information
  • Course Learning Objectives

    Upon successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

    • describe the process of adaptation to disability from a family systems perspective
    • analyze cases in terms of adaptation theories
    • develop theory-based counseling interventions for families in an adaptation process
    • become aware of one's own attitudes, beliefs, behaviors, and counter-transference issues that affect one's development as an adaptation counselor
  • Course Description

    Provides theoretical constructs for understanding the meaning of loss in maternal and child health, and techniques for short-term counseling that facilitate a healthy grief reaction for the bereaved family. Case studies of typical and atypical reactions are discussed for losses such as perinatal loss (miscarriage, stillbirth, neonatal death, termination of pregnancy for genetic reasons); birth of a child with a genetic condition/birth defect; death of a child with a chronic illness; and infertility. Topics include the psychology of pregnancy; and perinatal loss; phases of grief reaction; the art of facilitating bereavement; practical interventions in the hospital; follow-up counseling and short-term psychotherapy; resources; special needs of family members; gender differences; grandparent and sibling issues; provider issues (counter-transference, self-care, and burn-out prevention). Includes lecture, discussion, role play, video, field trips, and presentations by bereaved parents.

  • Intended Audience

    ScM in Genetic Counseling students

  • Methods of Assessment

    Grading Policy: Student evaluation based on class participation and written assignments.

    Grading Restrictions: Letter grade

  • Prerequisites

    415.650; Must be enrolled in ScM in Genetic Counseling Program

  • Academic Ethics Code

    The code, discussed in the Policy and Procedure Memorandum for Students, March 31, 2002, will be adhered to in this class:

    Students enrolled in the Bloomberg School of Public Health of The Johns Hopkins University assume an obligation to conduct themselves in a manner appropriate to the University's mission as an institution of higher education. A student is obligated to refrain from acts which he or she knows, or under the circumstances has reason to know, impair the academic integrity of the University. Violations of academic integrity include, but are not limited to: cheating; plagiarism; knowingly furnishing false information to any agent of the University for inclusion in the academic record; violation of the rights and welfare of animal or human subjects in research; and misconduct as a member of either School or University committees or recognized groups or organizations.

  • Disability Support Services

    If you are a student with a documented disability who requires an academic accommodation, please contact Betty H. Addison in the Office of Student Life Services: baddison@jhsph.edu, 410-955-3034, or 2017 E. Monument Street.